IMPROVE YOUR CHANCES OF EMERGING A WINNER IN THE HOMEVIDA SHORT FILM SCRIPT COMPETITION

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N100, 000 is up for grabs in the Homevida 2014 Short Film Script Competition and we want to help you win it! Improve your chances of emerging a winner by better understanding the competition, its mission, criteria and guidelines.

Terms of reference: this details articles 1 – 11 which provide important information about the competition, its goals, judges and overall modes of operation.

Short film script criteria: this details the criteria for short screenplays based on which winning scripts will be selected.

Rules and conditions: ensure that you as a writer are eligible and your script does not get disqualified by understanding the rules and regulations guiding the competition.

Related stories
Press release for the Homevida Short Film Script Competition.

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Homevida 2014 Short Screenplay Competition

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Stand a chance to win a N100, 000 and have your winning scripts turned into short films in the Homevida 2014 Call for Scripts Competition.

Homevida is calling on all Nigerians between the ages of 16 – 30 to send their original short scripts in these 3 categories: See it after the cut…

· The Investors Protection Prize, endowed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
· The Human Development Prize, endowed by United Nations Millennium Campaign (UNMC)
· Recognition for the Best Anti trafficking in Persons Script by United Nations on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and funded by the European Union (3 winners will be selected from this category)

To be eligible, all submitted scripts must be:
· Able to fit into a 10-15 minutes short film. Scripts should be no more than 15 pages.
· Have well defined characters and plot
· Typed and presented professionally in MS Word or PDF.

Entries close June 13, 2014.
To read more on the criteria for each category, click HERE
To submit your script, click here http://homevida.org/competitions/short-film-submition

Homevida is an initiative of the Public and Private Development Centre (PPDC). This initiative was created on a platform to drive creative messaging on integrity and value change by providing incentives to film makers who consider such values when making their movies. We have partnered with institutions such as Securities and Exchange Commission Nigeria (SEC), Bureau of Public Procurement (BPP), Code of Conduct Bureau (CCB), Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the National Film and Videos Censors Board (NFVCB).

For more enquiries on the competition: 08036267188 or info@homevida.org
To know more about our work and past events visit: http://www.homevida.org
Click here to watch the short film which won the Family Friendly Prize Homevida 2011 Short Scripts Competition

IMPORTANT! Improve your chances of emerging a winner by better understanding competition and its goals:
Terms of reference for the Homevida short film script competition.
Criteria for the short film script entries.
Rules and conditions for submission of short film scripts.

Sourced from the Homevida competition website and the Linda Ikeji blog

Visibility Zero: a short film by Toyin Oyekami

The story

Fred, a first-class university graduate roams the streets of Lagos for close to two years, strongly believing his university degree is his only ladder to success. Things move from bad to worse until he becomes friends with a blind street beggar, Temiwa.

Temiwa is a 28-year old beautiful lady with a ten-year old son, Wisdom. She became blind at 18, when she was raped and shot in the face during an armed robbery attack in which her parents were murdered. This led to her loss of sight and conception of Wisdom.

Watch the short film and leave a comment telling us what you think.

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A Short Film from Africa: Visibility Zero

Synopsis, THE MOVIE
Fred, a first-class university graduate roams the streets of Lagos for close to two years, strongly believing his university degree is his only ladder to success. Things move from bad to worse until he becomes friends with a blind street beggar, Temiwa.

Temiwa is a 28-year old beautiful lady with a ten-year old son, Wisdom. She became blind at 18, when she was raped and shot in the face during an armed robbery attack in which her parents were murdered. This led to her loss of sight and conception of Wisdom.

Visibility Zero, THE GOAL
Visibility Zero is a wake-up call to the average Nigerian graduate, to look inwards for self-discovery rather than perpetually wait to be employed by a big firm.

We hope that with awareness about this short film, we can raise funds for this project which is essentially about giving back to the community.

The Nigerian youth, in 2013, needs to be taught how to enhance his self-worth through rediscovery and skills acquisition, all to improve his chances of success in today’s world.

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My Name My Identity: Femi Amogunla from 30 Nigeria House Project

Femi Amogunla

In Conjunction with

Theatre Royal Stratford East London and Bank Of Industry

Presents

My name, My identity

An Award Winning Project (30 Nigeria House), 2012

Oruko mi ni Olorunfemijuwonlo Amogunla

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Watch the video “My Name My Identity” here.

My name is a song;
I can sing it as I want;
in Soprano High or Bass deep.
O-lo-run-fe-mi-ju-won-lo
Oh! It jars your ears.
(beat) I should shorten it?
I won’t. I will not reduce my name to F
A letter. And call it a nickname.
Or funkify it as P-h-e-m-m-y spelt P-h-e-m-m-y
Why?
Or change it to Famozo
…or its other version Famoshi
So that you might feel it?
My name is my identity.

My name is history.
History of valiant Yoruba men and women in battle.
Moremi, Ogunmola Afonja Kunrunmi
My name is their victory.
Amogunla, son of that famous warrior who killed an elephant with his cap
Kindred of Uthman Dan Fodio
Nnamdi Azikwe
And Achebe
Yes, that’s me!

I am every African who fought
And who still fights to keep his names
My name is history of a generation.
I lose it; we lose a story.
A string.
A line.
It becomes distorted.

My name is a symbol.
A symbol that rises early in the morning when my mother screams: Fe-mi.
It’s a sign of control, of power.

My name tells where I am from
That I am a Yoruba
That I am a Nigerian
That I love being both at once
Like an identity card
I don’t need to show it. It shows me.
I don’t have to shout it. It shouts me.
Shouts Yoruba, proclaims Nigerian.

My name has meanings.
It is freedom.
It is power.
It is love.
Love for myself.
For every part of me
Seen. Unseen.
Known. Unknown.
Written. Unwritten.
Loved. Unloved.

My name is like my dansiki;
I wear it as I want
In the sun or in the rain; it does not smell.​
I wear it in the cold or in the harmattan,
I stay warm
I can wriggle it as it pleases me
As I do bata dance

Bata drum with voice:
Olurunfemijuwonlo,
Iwo nko? Iwo nko?​3x

Let me sing as I want,
Let me wear it as I want.
Let me dance as it suits me
But never will I change it

Oruko mi ni Olorunfemijuwonlo Amogunla.
Ki ni oruko tire?
What is your own name?

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Some Words on My Name, My Identity

This thematic focus of this poem is the beauty of Yoruba/African culture as captured in the significance of a name, of my name. An African traditional name is more than just a name; it is more than just something we are called by or something that differentiates us from another. In fact, in the Yoruba belief system, what you are called, and how you are called goes a long way to affect what you turn out to be. In essence, African names define our cultural identity, lineage and on several occasions, the circumstances in which we lived and currently live.

In this award winning project by Femi Amogunla, he insists that he should be called by his name, the way it should be; not as an abbreviation or as a nickname because, it is believed that “whatever” you are called has a meaning.

The poet draws on personal examples of the challenges that he has faced when it comes to his name, and draws on how he has been able to keep bearing his name despite these.

The poem also goes ahead to show the challenges of holding on to this culture of naming in a fast changing world that seems to impose its change on one. The narrator refuses any other version of his name, and takes pride in what he’s called.

Rendered in English, this poem has a universal appeal, yet it is sprinkled with local Yoruba language, the poet calls the audience to a different language, to a different culture. It also makes use of accepted codes of culture like music.

Finally, it educates others about African lives, African pride and the struggle of the African past.

Check out our previous post on Femi Amogunla here.

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Short film trailer

What makes a man hit a woman? What drives him to that raging point where the only way he can communicate with her is through a clenched fist pounding her face? Continuously. Can a man ever be justified in taking such action?

Why doesn’t she leave him? Despite the black eyes and blue-bruised skin, why does she choose to stay? Love? Fear? Shame? She knows this won’t be the last time. She knows he will hit her again. Then why doesn’t she leave him?

Lagos based Nigerian film-maker Soji Ogunnaike presents “When Fishes Drown” an exploration of domestic violence through film.